Dispatch from Quito: Coronavirus and La Cuarentena in Ecuador

(This article was originally published by the Institute for the Study of the Americas at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.) I’ve watched the coronavirus crisis unfold from a quiet street in the suburbs of Quito, where I’m living with my family while on a research fellowship in Ecuador. After an early outbreak… Read More Dispatch from Quito: Coronavirus and La Cuarentena in Ecuador

Ecuador Landslide Deepens Virus Crisis as Oil Pipelines Severed for Weeks

Landslides severed Ecuador’s two oil pipelines last week, spilling heavy crude into the Coca River in the country’s northeastern Amazon region. Now, amid the ongoing coronavirus crisis, pipeline operators OCP Ecuador and Petroecuador are deploying humanitarian aid to communities downstream and trying to halt the oil before it reaches the Amazon. Emergency teams are also… Read More Ecuador Landslide Deepens Virus Crisis as Oil Pipelines Severed for Weeks

Ecuador’s Splintered Left on Trial with Correa

Ecuadorian ex-President Rafael Correa is on trial again, this time for campaign-finance fraud. Three years after a national referendum forced him from office, Correa is being tried in absentia for his alleged role in a scheme to extort government contractors for campaign contributions during his decade in power. Given the number of former Ecuadorian presidents… Read More Ecuador’s Splintered Left on Trial with Correa

Indigenous Elites: Survival and Subjugation in Colonial Latin America

By N. H. Gill            (Nov. 24, 2018) — Indigenous elites stood at the intersection of political subjugation and cultural survival in Spanish and Portuguese America. Over more than three centuries they acted as intermediaries between their communities and outsiders, as defenders before the law, and even as collaborators with local… Read More Indigenous Elites: Survival and Subjugation in Colonial Latin America

Between Two Worlds: Andean Haciendas in Colonial History

By N. H. Gill          (May, 2018) — When historian James Lockhart published his renown article “Encomienda and Hacienda” in 1969, the modern historiography on haciendas was already more than forty-years-old.[1] Yet even after decades, historians were only beginning to understand these New World estates in terms of their origins and functions… Read More Between Two Worlds: Andean Haciendas in Colonial History