Plotting Pachakuti: Incan Conquest Sites in the Galvin Murúa

Martín de Murúa was a Basque Mercedarian friar who wrote the Historia General del Piru (c.1580-1616), an illustrated history of what are today the South American nations of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. Murúa arrived in Peru in the early 1580s and traveled extensively as a missionary and translator of Quechua and Spanish in the… Read More Plotting Pachakuti: Incan Conquest Sites in the Galvin Murúa

Flattening the Curve: Ecuador and Brazil Pull Ahead in August

Ecuador virus cases plunged 37% in August, the most in South America after Brazil (40%), according to the WHO. In comparison, neighbors Colombia and Peru saw cases jump by 8% and 67%, respectively, in the same time period. On average, South American daily confirmed virus cases rose 35% in August, the data show. To be… Read More Flattening the Curve: Ecuador and Brazil Pull Ahead in August

Ecuador Credit Talks Silent on Debts to History

Ecuador won approval to restructure about a third of its international bonds this week, alleviating part of the fiscal hangover from the Correa administration’s ruinous decade in power. But while Finance Minister Richard Martínez negotiates with the country’s creditors abroad, a deeper debate about the nation’s historical debts is still needed at home. Behind Ecuador’s… Read More Ecuador Credit Talks Silent on Debts to History

Spotting Trends: ‘Bad Hombres’ in the News

Max Fisher, an international reporter and columnist for The New York Times, kicked off a debate last month about the “Latin Americanization” of the U.S. being the “defining trend of our time, arguably even more than right-wing populism.” Fisher later deleted his post and apologized, saying he hadn’t intended to imply that U.S. problems come… Read More Spotting Trends: ‘Bad Hombres’ in the News

Dispatch from Quito: Coronavirus and La Cuarentena in Ecuador

(This article was originally published by the Institute for the Study of the Americas at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.) I’ve watched the coronavirus crisis unfold from a quiet street in the suburbs of Quito, where I’m living with my family while on a research fellowship in Ecuador. After an early outbreak… Read More Dispatch from Quito: Coronavirus and La Cuarentena in Ecuador

Ecuador Landslide Deepens Virus Crisis as Oil Pipelines Severed for Weeks

Landslides severed Ecuador’s two oil pipelines last week, spilling heavy crude into the Coca River in the country’s northeastern Amazon region. Now, amid the ongoing coronavirus crisis, pipeline operators OCP Ecuador and Petroecuador are deploying humanitarian aid to communities downstream and trying to halt the oil before it reaches the Amazon. Emergency teams are also… Read More Ecuador Landslide Deepens Virus Crisis as Oil Pipelines Severed for Weeks

Ecuador’s Splintered Left on Trial with Correa

Ecuadorian ex-President Rafael Correa is on trial again, this time for campaign-finance fraud. Three years after a national referendum forced him from office, Correa is being tried in absentia for his alleged role in a scheme to extort government contractors for campaign contributions during his decade in power. Given the number of former Ecuadorian presidents… Read More Ecuador’s Splintered Left on Trial with Correa

Indigenous Elites: Survival and Subjugation in Colonial Latin America

Indigenous elites stood at the intersection of political subjugation and cultural survival in Spanish and Portuguese America. Over more than three centuries they acted as intermediaries between their communities and outsiders, as defenders before the law, and even as collaborators with local power groups in the exploitation of their own people. As such, they wielded… Read More Indigenous Elites: Survival and Subjugation in Colonial Latin America