Flattening the Curve: Ecuador and Brazil Pull Ahead in August

Ecuador virus cases plunged 37% in August, the most in South America after Brazil (40%), according to the WHO. In comparison, neighbors Colombia and Peru saw cases jump by 8% and 67%, respectively, in the same time period. On average, South American daily confirmed virus cases rose 35% in August, the data show. To be… Read More Flattening the Curve: Ecuador and Brazil Pull Ahead in August

Ecuador Credit Talks Silent on Debts to History

Ecuador won approval to restructure about a third of its international bonds this week, alleviating part of the fiscal hangover from the Correa administration’s ruinous decade in power. But while Finance Minister Richard Martínez negotiates with the country’s creditors abroad, a deeper debate about the nation’s historical debts is still needed at home. Behind Ecuador’s… Read More Ecuador Credit Talks Silent on Debts to History

Spotting Trends: ‘Bad Hombres’ in the News

Max Fisher, an international reporter and columnist for The New York Times, kicked off a debate last month about the “Latin Americanization” of the U.S. being the “defining trend of our time, arguably even more than right-wing populism.” Fisher later deleted his post and apologized, saying he hadn’t intended to imply that U.S. problems come… Read More Spotting Trends: ‘Bad Hombres’ in the News

Dispatch from Quito: Coronavirus and La Cuarentena in Ecuador

(This article was originally published by the Institute for the Study of the Americas at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.) I’ve watched the coronavirus crisis unfold from a quiet street in the suburbs of Quito, where I’m living with my family while on a research fellowship in Ecuador. After an early outbreak… Read More Dispatch from Quito: Coronavirus and La Cuarentena in Ecuador

Ecuador Landslide Deepens Virus Crisis as Oil Pipelines Severed for Weeks

Landslides severed Ecuador’s two oil pipelines last week, spilling heavy crude into the Coca River in the country’s northeastern Amazon region. Now, amid the ongoing coronavirus crisis, pipeline operators OCP Ecuador and Petroecuador are deploying humanitarian aid to communities downstream and trying to halt the oil before it reaches the Amazon. Emergency teams are also… Read More Ecuador Landslide Deepens Virus Crisis as Oil Pipelines Severed for Weeks

Ecuador’s Splintered Left on Trial with Correa

Ecuadorian ex-President Rafael Correa is on trial again, this time for campaign-finance fraud. Three years after a national referendum forced him from office, Correa is being tried in absentia for his alleged role in a scheme to extort government contractors for campaign contributions during his decade in power. Given the number of former Ecuadorian presidents… Read More Ecuador’s Splintered Left on Trial with Correa

Indigenous Elites: Survival and Subjugation in Colonial Latin America

Indigenous elites stood at the intersection of political subjugation and cultural survival in Spanish and Portuguese America. Over more than three centuries they acted as intermediaries between their communities and outsiders, as defenders before the law, and even as collaborators with local power groups in the exploitation of their own people. As such, they wielded… Read More Indigenous Elites: Survival and Subjugation in Colonial Latin America

Interwoven: Andean Lives in Colonial Ecuador’s Textile Economy: Corr

Corr, Rachel. Interwoven: Andean Lives in Colonial Ecuador’s Textile Economy. Tucson: The University of Arizona Press, 2018. Rachel Corr’s Interwoven: Andean Lives in Colonial Ecuador’s Textile Economy, looks at the social history of Pelileo and the San Ildefonso obraje in the Ecuadorian highlands from the perspectives of the indigenous families and enslaved people of African… Read More Interwoven: Andean Lives in Colonial Ecuador’s Textile Economy: Corr

Surveying the Field: Peasant Power in Andean History

Like many global hot spots of the twentieth century, the Andes is marked by its history of structural inequality, racial conflict, and legacies of poverty and violence. Tensions between urban and rural areas as well as between descendants of European and Andean ancestry still exist and remain a source of scholarly interest in the region.… Read More Surveying the Field: Peasant Power in Andean History

Between Two Worlds: Andean Haciendas in Colonial History

When historian James Lockhart published his renown article “Encomienda and Hacienda” in 1969, the modern historiography on haciendas was already more than forty-years-old.[1] Yet even after decades, historians were only beginning to understand these New World estates in terms of their origins and functions as colonial institutions. Early twentieth century scholars debated the extent of… Read More Between Two Worlds: Andean Haciendas in Colonial History

Land Reform, Historical Consciousness and Indigenous Activism: Huarcaya

Huarcaya, Sergio Miguel. “Land Reform, Historical Consciousness and Indigenous Activism in Late Twentieth-Century Ecuador.” Journal of Latin American Studies 50, no. 02 (May 2018): 411–40. Sergio Miguel Huarcaya’s article, “Land Reform, Historical Consciousness and Indigenous Activism in Late Twentieth-Century Ecuador,” explores how and why Ecuador’s indigenous movement embraced ethnic politics over class struggle after the… Read More Land Reform, Historical Consciousness and Indigenous Activism: Huarcaya

Correa, China y la Asamblea, afectados por el informe de la deuda

(Published originally in Mediato) El informe borrador –el cual aún no es concluyente– de la Contraloría sobre la deuda pública, presentado el 14 de marzo pasado, es un triunfo estratégico para el presidente Lenín Moreno. No solo permite responsabilizar al expresidente Rafael Correa del despilfarro fiscal, sino que Moreno también puede hacer corresponsable a la… Read More Correa, China y la Asamblea, afectados por el informe de la deuda

Ecuador habló: La minería es peor que Correa

(Published originally in Mediato) El referéndum del 4 de febrero fue significativo. En su nivel más obvio, le dio al presidente Lenín Moreno una sólida victoria política y al expresidente Rafael Correa una derrota asombrosa. Pero más allá de las reacciones en Quito, los votantes en las zonas mineras de la Sierra y el Oriente… Read More Ecuador habló: La minería es peor que Correa

Moving to the Suburbs: Reducciones in Recent Latin American Historiography

In 1503, the Spanish monarchy issued its first decree for the resettlement of indigenous groups in the Caribbean so that they would “live together” and “not remain or wander separated from each other in the backcountry.” [1]As the European conquest spread to North, Central, and South America, these new settlements – known as reducciones and… Read More Moving to the Suburbs: Reducciones in Recent Latin American Historiography

Communist Conspiracies and Imperial Plots in the Honduran General Strike

The historiography of the Honduras general strike of 1954 shows that the extent of communist influence and external Guatemalan involvement are still subjects of significant historical debate. Kevin Coleman’s A Camera in the Garden of Eden, which focuses on the self-forging of Honduran banana workers and their marginalized communities, is the latest addition to this… Read More Communist Conspiracies and Imperial Plots in the Honduran General Strike

Writing Revolution: Republican Politics in Three Cuban Histories

Luis E. Aguilar, Samuel Farber, and Robert Whitney present three complimentary interpretations of Cuba’s 1933 Revolution and the social unrest that led to the 1959 Revolution.[1] The authors explore the role of rising mass society, the influence of political and intellectual elites, and the impact of the United States’ intervention in Cuban affairs to shed… Read More Writing Revolution: Republican Politics in Three Cuban Histories

Investigación Subacuática en las Lagunas de Yahuarcocha: Echeverría-Almeida and Athens

Echeverría-Almeida, José, and John Stephen Athens. “Investigación Subacuática En Las Lagunas de Yahuarcocha, San Pablo, Mojanda, Provincia de Imbabura, Ecuador.” Revista de Arqueología Americana, no. 34 (2016). Echeverría-Almeida and Athens underwater survey of the Laguna Yahuarcocha (Lake of Blood) builds on earlier subaquatic research performed in the lake in the early 2000s. Besides concluding that… Read More Investigación Subacuática en las Lagunas de Yahuarcocha: Echeverría-Almeida and Athens

The Andean Wonder Drug: Cinchona Bark and Imperial Science in the Spanish Atlantic: Crawford

Crawford, Matthew James. The Andean Wonder Drug: Cinchona Bark and Imperial Science in the Spanish Atlantic, 1630-1800. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2016. Matthew Crawford’s The Andean Wonder Drug: Cinchona Bark and Imperial Science in the Spanish Atlantic, 1630-1800 is a fascinating history of quina, the medicinal tree bark of the chinchona tree, native… Read More The Andean Wonder Drug: Cinchona Bark and Imperial Science in the Spanish Atlantic: Crawford

Bailout Risk Grows for Ecuador After Worst Earthquake in Decades

By Nathan Gill April 19, 2016 (Bloomberg) — Before a 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck Ecuador on Saturday, the South American nation’s finances were already in tatters as the government struggled to meet payments to municipal authorities, oil companies and even cancer hospitals. Cut off from global bond markets, President Rafael Correa must now find enough money to… Read More Bailout Risk Grows for Ecuador After Worst Earthquake in Decades

Ecuador Quake Death Toll Rises as World Leaders Offer Support

By Benjamin Bain and Nathan Gill April 16, 2016 (Bloomberg) — World leaders from the Vatican to Washington offered support to Ecuador as casualties mounted following one of the strongest earthquakes to strike the South American country in decades. By Sunday evening, the number of dead had climbed to at least 246, from 77 earlier… Read More Ecuador Quake Death Toll Rises as World Leaders Offer Support