Correa, China y la Asamblea, afectados por el informe de la deuda

(Published originally in Mediato) El informe borrador –el cual aún no es concluyente– de la Contraloría sobre la deuda pública, presentado el 14 de marzo pasado, es un triunfo estratégico para el presidente Lenín Moreno. No solo permite responsabilizar al expresidente Rafael Correa del despilfarro fiscal, sino que Moreno también puede hacer corresponsable a la… Read More Correa, China y la Asamblea, afectados por el informe de la deuda

Ecuador habló: La minería es peor que Correa

(Published originally in Mediato) El referéndum del 4 de febrero fue significativo. En su nivel más obvio, le dio al presidente Lenín Moreno una sólida victoria política y al expresidente Rafael Correa una derrota asombrosa. Pero más allá de las reacciones en Quito, los votantes en las zonas mineras de la Sierra y el Oriente… Read More Ecuador habló: La minería es peor que Correa

Correa’s Back-Track on Tax Bills Fails to Halt Ecuador Protests

By Nathan Gill (Bloomberg) — Ecuador President Rafael Correa’s attempt to defuse nationwide protests by back-tracking on two controversial tax proposals failed to prevent opposition supporters marching for a ninth straight day Tuesday. Protesters gathered in the capital city, Quito, less than 24 hours after Correa called for calm and announced he would delay plans… Read More Correa’s Back-Track on Tax Bills Fails to Halt Ecuador Protests

South America’s Commodity Rout Spurs Public Spending on Housing

By Nathan Gill (Bloomberg) — Enrique Perez, who’s been building homes for most of his life in Ecuador, is finally going to make one for himself. Perez is an unlikely beneficiary of the plunge in crude prices. That prompted Ecuador, an OPEC nation, to offer mortgage subsidies to people like Perez, a construction worker. Ecuador… Read More South America’s Commodity Rout Spurs Public Spending on Housing

Ecuador Approves New Labor Law With Changes to Public Pensions

By Nathan Gill (Bloomberg) — Ecuador’s congress approved changes to the Andean nation’s labor laws on Tuesday, including the removal of a government subsidy meant to cover almost half of state pensioners’ monthly payments. Lawmakers approved the measure proposed by President Rafael Correa in a 91-to-29 vote, while government supporters and political opposition groups looked… Read More Ecuador Approves New Labor Law With Changes to Public Pensions

Indigenous and Afro-Ecuadorians Facing the Twenty-First Century: Marc Becker

A collection of essays on the construction and emergence of ethnic identities in the Ecuadorian Andes, edited by Marc Becker. The authors of the volume examine Afro-Ecuadorians and indigenous communities through the lens of politics, culture, religion, gender, and the environment to better understand the array of social problems facing the country. French sociologist Manuela… Read More Indigenous and Afro-Ecuadorians Facing the Twenty-First Century: Marc Becker

Wikileaks Founder Assange Seeks Asylum at Ecuador’s U.K. Embassy

Nathan Gill and Randall WoodsJune 19, 2012 Julian Assange, the founder of anti-secrecy group Wikileaks, sought asylum at Ecuador’s Embassy in London after exhausting his options through British courts to avert extradition to Sweden. Ecuador is studying the request and is in contact with the U.K. government, Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino told reporters in Quito… Read More Wikileaks Founder Assange Seeks Asylum at Ecuador’s U.K. Embassy

The History of Ecuador: George Lauderbaugh

George Lauderbaugh’s The History of Ecuador is a general survey of the country from pre-Colombian times to the present. In addition to biographical sketches of illustrious Ecuadorians, he focuses on three economic booms since 1890, the cacao boom of 1890—1914, the banana boom between 1948—1960, and the oil boom from 1970—1992. CitationLauderbaugh, George. The History… Read More The History of Ecuador: George Lauderbaugh